company ethics? copycat products? would you support this?

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    • Painter wrote:

      Bigdog wrote:

      Sorry I don’t like the idea of the open vents...not crazy about the water running onto the coil packs....sounds like a moisture nightmare..
      Yes it is..... I’m worried to death about water touching anything under the hood!
      That’s hard to believe especially when I think about years ago when a tiny bit of moisture under the distributor cap screwed everything up..
    • Bigdog wrote:

      Painter wrote:

      Bigdog wrote:

      Sorry I don’t like the idea of the open vents...not crazy about the water running onto the coil packs....sounds like a moisture nightmare..
      Yes it is..... I’m worried to death about water touching anything under the hood!
      That’s hard to believe especially when I think about years ago when a tiny bit of moisture under the distributor cap screwed everything up..
      Yeah, fortunately Polaris moved the distributor cap back into the 1960's!
      The only thing constant is change.
    • Water won't do shit to the engine, due to some dirt roads shortcut my vehicles are accumulating a ton of clay dust which has forced me to water hose even the sling.

      The engine is the place where I worry the least about how much water I throw in there.

      Vehicles now a days are tanks, I remember the days when going through a puddle resulted in a stalled vehicle.
      Proud owner of an Ultra Super Duper Faster than Light Red.
    • Neosolidus wrote:

      Water won't do shit to the engine, due to some dirt roads shortcut my vehicles are accumulating a ton of clay dust which has forced me to water hose even the sling.

      The engine is the place where I worry the least about how much water I throw in there.

      Vehicles now a days are tanks, I remember the days when going through a puddle resulted in a stalled vehicle.
      True and if you are really worried carry WD40 !
      FL D12 OG
    • some years back my wife had a Lincoln LS, a 6 cylinder version that I was told was actually designed by Jaguar. Damn thing had the air intake mounted down low near the wheel well and when she drove through a rain flooded intersection in a line of other cars on her way home from work one night her car was the only one that didnt make it through. Water splashed up and got sucked right into the motor and literally killed it. Fortunately our insurance treated it as an accident and replaced the motor, but the car was never really the same dont know if water got in other places or if it was just a coincidence, but after that we started having one problem after another including having to replace the transmission - ended up getting rid of it because we just didnt trust it - It really kind of sucked because my wife really loved that car

      As a side note that is the only car I have ever owned with a hydraulically powered cooling fan - that was another thing we had nothing but problems with
    • This past Sunday...here in Ftlauderdale...We had the mother of all rains...it literally rained for 4 hours straight. Everything was flooded and deep flooding to boot. Right outside our shop a 2013 Dodge charger with a 5.7 hemi came flying down the street and sure enough...Hydro locked the engine.
      He proceeded to push that car out of the lake (no pun intended) and into my parking lot where he asked us to look at it.

      We fully thought the engine would need to be replaced!! We rest of this story is the absolute truth!! We sucked 3/4 gallon of water out of his intake...the intake manifold and all of the cylinders after removing all 16 spark plugs. We put a little trans fluid into each cylinder and hand turned over the engine from the crank to see if there was any obvious engine damage and it didn't seem like there was any. We replace all the plugs with new ones and also had to replace the starter (he kept trying to start it while the starter was under water).

      Put it all back together and tried to start it and the engine fired right up and ran like a dream. I don't know if there will be any lasting electrical problems from the water but that engine ran like a champ. Got to give it to Dodge engines.


      SSreaper
      :BLACKSS: 2016 SL LE BLACK PEARL :HEADERSS: :COLDAIRSS: :COILOVERSS:
    • SSREAPER wrote:

      This past Sunday...here in Ftlauderdale...We had the mother of all rains...it literally rained for 4 hours straight. Everything was flooded and deep flooding to boot. Right outside our shop a 2013 Dodge charger with a 5.7 hemi came flying down the street and sure enough...Hydro locked the engine.
      He proceeded to push that car out of the lake (no pun intended) and into my parking lot where he asked us to look at it.

      We fully thought the engine would need to be replaced!! We rest of this story is the absolute truth!! We sucked 3/4 gallon of water out of his intake...the intake manifold and all of the cylinders after removing all 16 spark plugs. We put a little trans fluid into each cylinder and hand turned over the engine from the crank to see if there was any obvious engine damage and it didn't seem like there was any. We replace all the plugs with new ones and also had to replace the starter (he kept trying to start it while the starter was under water).

      Put it all back together and tried to start it and the engine fired right up and ran like a dream. I don't know if there will be any lasting electrical problems from the water but that engine ran like a champ. Got to give it to Dodge engines.


      SSreaper
      Years ago at the NSRA show Columbus, Ohio Fair Grounds they flooded out probably at least a couple thousand cars. They pulled the plugs turned the engines over and put the plugs back in and changed the fluids (Trans and rear ends) and drove them home.
    • FunCycle wrote:

      SSREAPER wrote:

      This past Sunday...here in Ftlauderdale...We had the mother of all rains...it literally rained for 4 hours straight. Everything was flooded and deep flooding to boot. Right outside our shop a 2013 Dodge charger with a 5.7 hemi came flying down the street and sure enough...Hydro locked the engine.
      He proceeded to push that car out of the lake (no pun intended) and into my parking lot where he asked us to look at it.

      We fully thought the engine would need to be replaced!! We rest of this story is the absolute truth!! We sucked 3/4 gallon of water out of his intake...the intake manifold and all of the cylinders after removing all 16 spark plugs. We put a little trans fluid into each cylinder and hand turned over the engine from the crank to see if there was any obvious engine damage and it didn't seem like there was any. We replace all the plugs with new ones and also had to replace the starter (he kept trying to start it while the starter was under water).

      Put it all back together and tried to start it and the engine fired right up and ran like a dream. I don't know if there will be any lasting electrical problems from the water but that engine ran like a champ. Got to give it to Dodge engines.


      SSreaper
      Years ago at the NSRA show Columbus, Ohio Fair Grounds they flooded out probably at least a couple thousand cars. They pulled the plugs turned the engines over and put the plugs back in and changed the fluids (Trans and rear ends) and drove them home.
      the real problems happen if the engine is running especially if it is running at speed. water, unlike air, does not compress. If a cylinder fills with water and the engine is running when it tries to compress that water and cant something else has to give, usually its the rods.
    • My biggest concern is because the coils and coil electrical plugs are right there exposed on top... thinking if any moisture got in the connections things would go south..plus the big trough in the top of the valve cover probably hold a quart of water..
    • edwardaneal wrote:

      the real problems happen if the engine is running especially if it is running at speed. water, unlike air, does not compress. If a cylinder fills with water and the engine is running when it tries to compress that water and cant something else has to give, usually its the rods.
      Consider this, water evaporates at 100C, pistons, valves and heads are around 260C(combustion is much higher) when water evaporates it expands 1600 times in volume. The pistons most likely never get a chance to compress anything because they are already going backwards. Those of you who are trained fire fighters would most likely confirm this theory.
    • edwardaneal wrote:

      the real problems happen if the engine is running especially if it is running at speed. water, unlike air, does not compress. If a cylinder fills with water and the engine is running when it tries to compress that water and cant something else has to give, usually its the rods.
      Well I can tell you that the Dodge was running like a bat out of hell when he hit that water and locked that engine right up. I did not expect that engine to run again and I told him that before I told him we would look at it but suprised the hell out of me!

      SSreaper
      :BLACKSS: 2016 SL LE BLACK PEARL :HEADERSS: :COLDAIRSS: :COILOVERSS:
    • SSREAPER wrote:

      edwardaneal wrote:

      the real problems happen if the engine is running especially if it is running at speed. water, unlike air, does not compress. If a cylinder fills with water and the engine is running when it tries to compress that water and cant something else has to give, usually its the rods.
      Well I can tell you that the Dodge was running like a bat out of hell when he hit that water and locked that engine right up. I did not expect that engine to run again and I told him that before I told him we would look at it but suprised the hell out of me!
      SSreaper
      no doubt he was very lucky, my wifes Lincoln didnt fare as well, but then again it sucked in allot of water
    • Neosolidus wrote:

      Water won't do shit to the engine, due to some dirt roads shortcut my vehicles are accumulating a ton of clay dust which has forced me to water hose even the sling.

      The engine is the place where I worry the least about how much water I throw in there.

      Vehicles now a days are tanks, I remember the days when going through a puddle resulted in a stalled vehicle.
      One of my favorite (almost) harmless pranks when I was a (much) younger man was to pull the coil wire from the distributor on my 'friend's' cars and put a thin piece of wet paper around the end of the wire and replace it in the distributor. The car would start and run until the heat from the spark dried the paper and it would no longer conduct electricity. Then the car would stall, usually about 3 blocks away. Hilarious to me in an immature sort of way and difficult to diagnose if they weren't that good of a friend. I don't want to give my secrets away but the paper often had an image of the Zig Zag man on it.

      mniron wrote:

      edwardaneal wrote:

      the real problems happen if the engine is running especially if it is running at speed. water, unlike air, does not compress. If a cylinder fills with water and the engine is running when it tries to compress that water and cant something else has to give, usually its the rods.
      Consider this, water evaporates at 100C, pistons, valves and heads are around 260C(combustion is much higher) when water evaporates it expands 1600 times in volume. The pistons most likely never get a chance to compress anything because they are already going backwards. Those of you who are trained fire fighters would most likely confirm this theory.
      I hadn't thought about that. Another reason not to be concerned about the open hood concept. Even if you pull over to let the rain pass, the water will not accumulate on a running engine. Is that what you're saying? (I'm not a trained fire fighter)
      The only thing constant is change.

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