Tires...what are you running?

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    • dangerdarrell wrote:

      Ordered BFG Sport Comp because Discount Tire had very Good ratings on it. Should be in Monday so I had to mod the existing Kenda.
      Can't get the video to upload but it was a lot of fun in a large, empty parking lot. Got to learn how the traction control works and how the rev limiter works. :thumbsup:
      Ah yes, the Kenda mod! A fine ending to a mediocre tire. I believe you'll enjoy the SportComp 2 (I presume they were 2's). So far, good reviews from customers, and I've been impressed with them as well.
    • Flybuddy wrote:

      MACAWS wrote:

      Flybuddy wrote:

      I went ahead and lowered the pressure today. While doing so I checked the sidewall for info. It's a 50 psi tire that we're already running underinflated. The sidewalls are simply 2 plys of polyester and the tire is relatively soft. On the Can Am Spyders we all had an issue with the stock Kendas having excess wear in the middle of the rear tire regardless of high or low tire pressure. Video showed that the center of the tire tended to egg out at higher speeds.
      FlybuddyI am by no means an expert but I think we need to take weight into consideration. The tires are made for much heavier
      cars. We have very little weight at the back wheel so it may be a big factor. I also treat the SS like a bike if it is raining I avoid riding.
      Agree with you, it's a matter of figuring out the right pressure as we're running only about half of max pressure. Lower pressure generally makes sense when center wear is excessive. I'm concerned that it might be high speed egging on a soft tire. It might be that if we stiffen it up with more pressure it may be less prone to flexing. I'm surely no expert either. We DO know that running 32 is not good. I'm rolling the dice with you on 28 (4, 7s!) and may increase for known wet conditions. If the wear doesn't improve we can always try higher on the next tire.
      All very true. Our machines are about even on weight distribution, with about 600 lbs. per wheel. But as mentioned, the tires that are prevalent today in these size ranges are designed for considerably heavier cars. As an example, consider a four-wheeled car of 600 lbs. per wheel, 2400 total. In the USA, that would be a subcompact, and would come with much smaller diameter wheels/tires. However, the cars in the wheel size ranges we are running are considerably heavier, and will compress the tire more; as such, said tires have a stronger (stiffer) sidewall and more robust overall carcass design to not only support the heavier weight, but also to do so without overheating. When we use such a tire with a much lighter vehicle, the deflection/compression of the tire between rim and road surface is reduced, and subsequently so is the actual "footprint" area. The footprint will remain full width, but will be reduced in length, as viewed from front to rear, decreasing the overall area of contact and the effective grip.

      Yes, in order to countermand these aspects, lower pressure is a great place to start. I personally am experimenting with pressures in the low to mid 20's with good success so far. I suggest the individual go right down to 28 and play from there. The suggested numbers from Polaris are mostly an ultra-safe starting point that combines many desired outcomes, not taking into account only that which supports best handling. Reduce your pressure a PSI at a time, do it in the morning when they are cold, and see how you like it. Drive it for a day or two and note the difference. How low can you go? We'd practically have to move into the teens in pressure to cause any real overheat dangers, I'd imagine...and I doubt we'd ever get there. All the same, as you play with lower pressure, take the opportunity to see how hot they are after a long highway run. Some heat is normal, of course, but as a SWAG rule of thumb, they are OK so long as they are not too hot to touch. If you can't handle the heat in your hand and fingers, it's likely to be somewhere north of approximately 150*F, which is the danger zone, and you should add some pressure back. It's all about the deflection/compression I noted earlier: when the tires has to contend with too much of it as it rotates and flexes at too low a pressure, the resultant friction of that additional flexing is where the additional heat is generated.

      As for wear, the basic rules hold true. If it's wearing out the inside, too high of pressure...if it's wearing out the edges more, then it's likely too low. Careful on analyzing the edges of your front tires though...as steering tires, if you push it in corners a lot, they will naturally wear and feather more on the very edge, near the corner.

      All that said, our search for the best tires is likely to end up a somewhat subjective journey of experimentation and info-sharing, as we're unlikely to find off-the-shelf offerings in these sizes that ideally suit our lightweight machines. Let's all keep comparing notes and findings :thumbdown: :thumbup:

      And all THAT said...if one is really serious about handling on these machines, I've come to learn that one is truly just dicking around until the stock dampers end up gathering dust in your garage attic. Trying to overcome the big picture with tires alone is ultimately futile. Oh sure, there's room for improvement in replacing only tires, but the spongy, low-performance coilovers are utterly overmatched one we start carving corners. The stock coilovers are such a concession to universal comfort for all possible owners, as well as to low cost, that they are utterly incapable of supporting a quality handling experience. Slingshot has the chassis and the balance to be a real performer in the twisties, and all it takes is a good set of adjustable coilovers and upgraded tires to unleash the beast within. Not surprisingly, we have been developing a coilover set that will offer a superb improvement at a reasonable cost, and I am about to release details :thumbsup:
    • funinthesun wrote:

      I'm using one of those cheap imported ones called a Baldino. Traction isn't good, ride is horrible and it hydroplanes on the morning dew. Here' a picture of the latest one



      NOTE: Don't hate the poster, hate the turbo that causes this to happen
      Haters gonna boost! I also have a distinct dislike for tires. They are my nemesis, and must be destroyed!

    • Bill from Hahn RaceCraft wrote:

      Flybuddy wrote:

      MACAWS wrote:

      Flybuddy wrote:

      I went ahead and lowered the pressure today. While doing so I checked the sidewall for info. It's a 50 psi tire that we're already running underinflated. The sidewalls are simply 2 plys of polyester and the tire is relatively soft. On the Can Am Spyders we all had an issue with the stock Kendas having excess wear in the middle of the rear tire regardless of high or low tire pressure. Video showed that the center of the tire tended to egg out at higher speeds.
      FlybuddyI am by no means an expert but I think we need to take weight into consideration. The tires are made for much heaviercars. We have very little weight at the back wheel so it may be a big factor. I also treat the SS like a bike if it is raining I avoid riding.
      Agree with you, it's a matter of figuring out the right pressure as we're running only about half of max pressure. Lower pressure generally makes sense when center wear is excessive. I'm concerned that it might be high speed egging on a soft tire. It might be that if we stiffen it up with more pressure it may be less prone to flexing. I'm surely no expert either. We DO know that running 32 is not good. I'm rolling the dice with you on 28 (4, 7s!) and may increase for known wet conditions. If the wear doesn't improve we can always try higher on the next tire.
      All very true. Our machines are about even on weight distribution, with about 600 lbs. per wheel. But as mentioned, the tires that are prevalent today in these size ranges are designed for considerably heavier cars. As an example, consider a four-wheeled car of 600 lbs. per wheel, 2400 total. In the USA, that would be a subcompact, and would come with much smaller diameter wheels/tires. However, the cars in the wheel size ranges we are running are considerably heavier, and will compress the tire more; as such, said tires have a stronger (stiffer) sidewall and more robust overall carcass design to not only support the heavier weight, but also to do so without overheating. When we use such a tire with a much lighter vehicle, the deflection/compression of the tire between rim and road surface is reduced, and subsequently so is the actual "footprint" area. The footprint will remain full width, but will be reduced in length, as viewed from front to rear, decreasing the overall area of contact and the effective grip.
      Yes, in order to countermand these aspects, lower pressure is a great place to start. I personally am experimenting with pressures in the low to mid 20's with good success so far. I suggest the individual go right down to 28 and play from there. The suggested numbers from Polaris are mostly an ultra-safe starting point that combines many desired outcomes, not taking into account only that which supports best handling. Reduce your pressure a PSI at a time, do it in the morning when they are cold, and see how you like it. Drive it for a day or two and note the difference. How low can you go? We'd practically have to move into the teens in pressure to cause any real overheat dangers, I'd imagine...and I doubt we'd ever get there. All the same, as you play with lower pressure, take the opportunity to see how hot they are after a long highway run. Some heat is normal, of course, but as a SWAG rule of thumb, they are OK so long as they are not too hot to touch. If you can't handle the heat in your hand and fingers, it's likely to be somewhere north of approximately 150*F, which is the danger zone, and you should add some pressure back. It's all about the deflection/compression I noted earlier: when the tires has to contend with too much of it as it rotates and flexes at too low a pressure, the resultant friction of that additional flexing is where the additional heat is generated.

      As for wear, the basic rules hold true. If it's wearing out the inside, too high of pressure...if it's wearing out the edges more, then it's likely too low. Careful on analyzing the edges of your front tires though...as steering tires, if you push it in corners a lot, they will naturally wear and feather more on the very edge, near the corner.

      All that said, our search for the best tires is likely to end up a somewhat subjective journey of experimentation and info-sharing, as we're unlikely to find off-the-shelf offerings in these sizes that ideally suit our lightweight machines. Let's all keep comparing notes and findings :thumbdown: :thumbup:

      And all THAT said...if one is really serious about handling on these machines, I've come to learn that one is truly just dicking around until the stock dampers end up gathering dust in your garage attic. Trying to overcome the big picture with tires alone is ultimately futile. Oh sure, there's room for improvement in replacing only tires, but the spongy, low-performance coilovers are utterly overmatched one we start carving corners. The stock coilovers are such a concession to universal comfort for all possible owners, as well as to low cost, that they are utterly incapable of supporting a quality handling experience. Slingshot has the chassis and the balance to be a real performer in the twisties, and all it takes is a good set of adjustable coilovers and upgraded tires to unleash the beast within. Not surprisingly, we have been developing a coilover set that will offer a superb improvement at a reasonable cost, and I am about to release details :thumbsup:
      Bill

      Sooooooooo Glad to have you back posting and sharing your years on knowledge. Would love to see what you would do / suggest for a coil over package. I am currently running Bilsteins single adjustable which were a tremendous improvement noticeable from day one. However with more opportunities to play on road courses I can see the need for more adjustment.
      Any Thoughts?
      MOE MONEY - MOE MODS
      :GRAYSS:
      LONE WOLF
    • @Bill from Hahn RaceCraft great post!...but it would only let me 'like' once :)
      @MACAWS I hear ya...I'm running the JRI 2 way which are unbelievable...but a 3 way would be even better. I accelerate really hard out of turns and on bumpy AR roads, to be able to weaken the rebound on the rear would help even more, IMHO
      Supporter H&P Animal Alliance
    • I am using the 275/35ZR-18 Hankook Ventus V12 evo2 XL for the rear
      225/45ZR-17 Hankook Ventus V12 evo2 XL for the fronts.


      I have about 8,500miles on the rear with some tread life left. I am going to purchase another rear to put on before the long drive to the Smokies.


      Nice looking tread and pretty good wear. Traction seems to be as good as it will get without going to a Soft track style tire.


      Anyone else running these tires have an opinion?
    • bookmd wrote:

      @Bill from Hahn RaceCraft great post!...but it would only let me 'like' once :)
      @MACAWS I hear ya...I'm running the JRI 2 way which are unbelievable...but a 3 way would be even better. I accelerate really hard out of turns and on bumpy AR roads, to be able to weaken the rebound on the rear would help even more, IMHO
      I am running the JRI 2 Ways also and they are pretty amazing! I was going to get the JRI hydro setup but I couldn't justify the 3k extra to adjust it here and there.
    • Nemesis1701 wrote:

      You guys have to slow down! Attention spam is .......well .....Ok Where was I?
      All these details WOW!
      I lost Bill......lost Macaws.......what .....Ok
      Oh ok......tires we taking about tires......
      Ok back on track wait WTF where was I?
      Go have another Heineken Bro! :thumbsup:
      Slingshots: making children out of adults since 2014
    • Bill@Hahn Racecraft wrote:

      Slingshot has the chassis and the balance to be a real performer in the twisties, and all it takes is a good set of adjustable coilovers and upgraded tires to unleash the beast within. Not surprisingly, we have been developing a coilover set that will offer a superb improvement at a reasonable cost, and I am about to release details
      A step up shock at a reasonable cost will be a huge seller in this market. Current choices are keeping the stock 50 dollar value shocks or jumping to a grand for non adjustables. Elka tapped into the Spyder market with multiple models available that started at 500 bucks. They were substantially better and they sold like candy at Halloween.
    • Well just took the SS out for a spin with my new Sumi rear tire - air pressure at roughly at 28-29. All was well solid grip no lost traction and then it started to rain.......no difference from the stock Kendas .......hydroplaning all over the road but this time I looked cool doing it. 8)
      FL D12 OG
    • Nemesis1701 wrote:

      Well just took the SS out for a spin with my new Sumi rear tire - air pressure at roughly at 28-29. All was well solid grip no lost traction and then it started to rain.......no difference from the stock Kendas .......hydroplaning all over the road but this time I looked cool doing it. 8)
      You were cool before the new rubber
      MOE MONEY - MOE MODS
      :GRAYSS:
      LONE WOLF
    • Flybuddy wrote:

      Bill@Hahn Racecraft wrote:


      A step up shock at a reasonable cost will be a huge seller in this market. Current choices are keeping the stock 50 dollar value shocks or jumping to a grand for non adjustables. Elka tapped into the Spyder market with multiple models available that started at 500 bucks. They were substantially better and they sold like candy at Halloween.
      a set of QA-1s with your choice of spring weight is $675 shipped. These are the single adjustable for damping (height adjusting doesn't count).
    • BryanL wrote:

      Flybuddy wrote:

      Bill@Hahn Racecraft wrote:


      A step up shock at a reasonable cost will be a huge seller in this market. Current choices are keeping the stock 50 dollar value shocks or jumping to a grand for non adjustables. Elka tapped into the Spyder market with multiple models available that started at 500 bucks. They were substantially better and they sold like candy at Halloween.
      a set of QA-1s with your choice of spring weight is $675 shipped. These are the single adjustable for damping (height adjusting doesn't count).
      good price.
      ___________________________________
      #02828 January 2015 build date.
      Here to assist anyone in the Denver area.

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