HELP! Alpha supercharged SS with too rich fuel mixture

  • With so many issues, you should really verify the below items...

    • Do you have good fuel pressure? Borrow and plug in a gauge to the stock fuel rail bleeder valve.
    • Are you injectors working correctly and clean? Google AUS Injection and maybe send them out for flow cleaning.
    • Are you running the right plugs? Maybe switch to these, which are the best I have found - http://www.jegs.com/i/Brisk-USA/084/RR14S/10002/-1


    I never heard of that brand before. Are they really that Good? Have you tried E3s, and if so, how do they compare?

  • @Street DocI personally wouldn't run any plugs with multiple electrodes. I don't see the point and have yet to see any research on how they help when running a boosted setup. These Brisk Silver Racing are nice plugs if you are running boost, especially over 10psi. They are the exact same reach, thread, and seat type as the stock plugs, but are 2 stages colder and use silver. I like silver much better than iridium and copper because they transfer heat better, which helps with detonation.


    I wish I could report better on how I like them compared to the NGK copper plugs, but my motor let go.

    Owner of Slingshot #263 that has some stock parts left on it. :D

  • @Street DocI personally wouldn't run any plugs with multiple electrodes. I don't see the point and have yet to see any research on how they help when running a boosted setup. These Brisk Silver Racing are nice plugs if you are running boost, especially over 10psi. They are the exact same reach, thread, and seat type as the stock plugs, but are 2 stages colder and use silver. I like silver much better than iridium and copper because they transfer heat better, which helps with detonation.


    I wish I could report better on how I like them compared to the NGK copper plugs, but my motor let go.

    Not your new one???!!! ?(

    In my defense, I was left unsupervised.

  • No, it's can't be plugged in backwards, but if memory serves me correctly, the two outer wires need to be swapped when making the changeover. DON'T take my word for it though. Someone who has a s/c set-up can verify if that's correct or not

  • Green wire needs to be matched up with green wire. You CAN easily plug it in the other way, so the colors don't match and the wires are crossed. When this happens, it will run exactly like your video.

    For future reference, sharpie both correct "up" sides with red or silver that way the next person can't mess it up.

    Owner of Slingshot #263 that has some stock parts left on it. :D

  • What was the year models and applications for the engines with the sand cast blocks? (Which brand, model, and year)


    I definitely want to go ahead and pick one up to start on for when my current engine bites the dust.


    Also it would be helpful if someone with the knowledge and experience of these engines could advise how much they can safely be bored and or stroked and still remain a dependable daily driver with the SC installed. There is no replacement for displacement!


    Inquiring minds would like to know! LOL


    Tim "Ghost" Ganey
    Winfield, Alabama
    205spam412spam2868

    Edited once, last by Ghost ().


  • This is a copy and paste for ddmworks site....so all our blocks are foam casted unless upgraded


    We are happy to now offer 3rd gen blocks as a build option. What are 3rd gen blocks? The original LE5/LE9 engine found in the Slingshot has its block cast by a process called "lost foam". During this process a styrofoam engine core is placed in sand and molten aluminum is poured into the mold were the aluminum replaces the styrofoam. If you look closely at the side of the stock engine, you will see the surface looks like styofoam because of this process. This lost foam process allowed GM to cast a complicated engine relatively easily, however it was found to cause a weak point that can allow small cracks to form in the block. This led GM to improve the block during the next revision with a sand cast version of the block. The new 3rd gen sand cast block gives a more uniform finish in the block and is less prone to cracking found in the lost foam castings. GM didn't just stop there though with that improvements to this block, they also added more material to the inside of the block to strengthen the block internally. The most important upgrade however came to the cylinder bores themselves. The stock LE5/LE9 has floating cylinder bores, which mean that the top of the cylinder bores are not secured to the block, the new 3rd gen blocks added material at the top of the cylinder bores to bridge and stabilize the tops of the bores. This bridge also increased the amount of aluminum around the top of the bores to help strengthen the cylinders even more against higher cylinder pressures found with high horsepower builds.