What was today's Sling project-Mods , goodies.....?

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  • Nitrogen is delivered as a dry clean gas. Air from a compressor is saturated with moisture and this moisture will change the pressures in the tire depending on the temperatures it sees. Just remember the air your putting in from a normal air compressor is putting 78% nitrogen to begin with but its also has moisture in it

    air here in the desert is so dry and low in humidity that when I open the valve in the bottom to let any water out of my compressor it doesnt even make a wet spot,


    no way there is enough water to make me worry enough to run out and do the nitrogen thing


    Also since for all practical purposes water doesn't compress I don't see how it can contribute much if anything to changes in tire pressure


    lesson learned in high school chemistry when my friend Dave Helm filled a flask all the way to the top with water and then slammed the stopper in with his fist causing the beaker to explode - - Chemistry teacher smiled and simply said "and now you have learned that water doesnt compress Mr Helm"


    laughed so hard I dang near fell off my stool

    Cage Free - 2016 Pearl Red SL
    JRI GT coil overs, DDM short shifter
    Twist Dynamics Sway Bar & DDM mounts

    MeanSling Sport Top & OEM Dual Windshield + Misc Goodies

    Edited once, last by edwardaneal ().

  • The military wants the airplanes and helicopters to keep coming back for nitrogen because they need the repeat business. It’s a real cash cow.


    That’s how Obama was able to send billions to Iran. Keep filling them tires.

  • You are correct water does not compress but it will expand with heat.

    On our dirt track race car the rear tires will gain as much as 15 psi as they are spinning almost constantly. The right front will gain about 5 psi. This is with compressed air from an air compressor and high humidity.

    When we have nitrogen in the tires the gain is not as much. But there is still some moisture in the tires.

    :BLUESS:
    Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did do.
    ~Mark Twain~

  • Doc&Ruby , Doc you are compairing Nitrogen to Oxygen to plain air we breath, and that is what we inflate our tires with. The air we breath will leak out of tires over time and so will Nitrogen. It just takes longer for Nitrogen. And that is fact not science.

    Nitrogen and oxygen are the gasses that make up our atmosphere (78% & 21% respectively), they are the gasses we breathe and that we fill tires with.

    Any time you pressurize a permeable membrane, be it a rubber tire or a balloon, gas under pressure will leak or diffuse through the membrane. "Permiable" means the membrane has holes that gas leaks through, whether this is a gap in the rubber or a gap along the bead of a tire or a gap in a pressure valve makes no difference.

    If you are leaking gas through a membrane, for any given size gap, smaller molecules get through easier and faster than large ones. This only makes sense if you think about it for a bit. Oxygen molecules are larger and heavier than nitrogen molecules. Check any periodic table on this, Nitrogen is number 7, oxygen is number 8. Nitrogen, the smaller, lighter molecules will diffuse faster (leak faster) through any given barrier.

    If you are comparing pure (100%) nitrogen to air (78% N2), there is very little difference at all, but pure N2 will leak away slightly faster. The difference is VERY small; you would have to have a very precise experiment to even measure the difference.


    For the average driver, there is no detectable difference in tire wear, handling, or anything else when filling with pure nitrogen over regular air. There is a cost difference however, but the added expense and bother don't pay off behind the wheel.


    Sorry, in this case the science doesn't support the advertised claims.

    The smarter you get, the funnier I am.

  • N2 does have a larger atomic radii as a gas than O2. But, the main reason 100% N2 is used in aircraft tires is the pressure... The loads on these tires are high and the tires are small -- so these tires are often kept close to 200 PSI. Some things will spontaneously combust in 250+ PSI air (at standard room temps) -- hence the use of 100% N2. This is due to the increase in O2 partial pressure. Sometimes this is referred to as "dieseling". Look up "fire piston" and watch videos of people using a simple plunger with a bit of cotton on the end as a lighter. People have been killed by poorly designed or faulty office chairs, where the pneumatic cylinder diesels and shoots the piston rod up through the chair (and whoever happens to be sitting on it). This is the reason a lot of the gas pistons/cylinders use non-combustible silicon oils and are nitrogen charged, to avoid dieseling explosions.


    All that said, if your tire is at 4+ ATM, the partial pressure of O2 in the tire can be equivalent to 100% O2 at standard atmospheric pressure. Hence, the reason air released from a tire smells like rotten eggs -- that O2 has been oxidizing your tire from the inside out. Some of the pressure reduction in a tire is the O2 being consumed by rubber compounds/oils in the tire (oxidation). I've used 100% N2 in my tires for decades. Science? I'm an engineer and a pilot.

  • Personally I like to use a mixture of 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen & a bit less than 1% argon & carbon dioxide


    it is difficult to get the percentages exact so sometimes a bit of helium or methane gets in there

    Cage Free - 2016 Pearl Red SL
    JRI GT coil overs, DDM short shifter
    Twist Dynamics Sway Bar & DDM mounts

    MeanSling Sport Top & OEM Dual Windshield + Misc Goodies

  • just for kicks and giggles I just opened the drain valve on my compressor that has been under pressure for at least a month since the last time I did this - not one drop of water in fact no perceivable moisture at all. so I closed it and let the tank refill - we are at 11% humidity right now so I think i'm good

    Cage Free - 2016 Pearl Red SL
    JRI GT coil overs, DDM short shifter
    Twist Dynamics Sway Bar & DDM mounts

    MeanSling Sport Top & OEM Dual Windshield + Misc Goodies

  • just for kicks and giggles I just opened the drain valve on my compressor that has been under pressure for at least a month since the last time I did this - not one drop of water in fact no perceivable moisture at all. so I closed it and let the tank refill - we are at 11% humidity right now so I think i'm good

    Yesterday we were at 100% humidity and over 85° nice day in Northern Indiana.

  • Not a genius on this subject of air vs nitrogen...

    Just experience from military aircraft point of view.


    We were in constant combat with moisture. Moisture was an enemy to all systems. From corrosion, electronics infiltration, ice formation, fogging; you name it. Moisture can be detrimental to systems that encounter extreme environmental changes in short periods. Moisture can crystalize in seconds and water pools could expand rapidly as they freeze.

    I won't go into all the things we did to circumvent water in the systems.


    But tires...


    On low pressure tires, 80 to 160 psi...

    We used compressors with dryers and pet cock drains.


    On high pressure tires, 180 to 225 psi...

    Nitrogen was used.


    Tires were serviced every time within hours prior flight. Nitrogen or air made no difference in servicing interval requirement.


    Nitrogen is a dry source gas.


    Nitrogen was used in many systems. It is used to purge and service contained systems. Nitrogen also reduces source of ignition feed.


    So, whether to use air or nitrogen in land based tires... meh.



    I've had several GM vehicles with aluminum wheels. Many of those were daily drivers, so 10 plus years old. The rims could be cleaned and sealed, but they would start leaking months later. Then they got cleaned and filled with Nitrogen. No issues with leaks after that. I know of at least 4 cars I had that were that way, and all were fine after switching over to Nitrogen. Wasn't expensive, and fixed the issue. IMHO, not snake oil in some cases.....


    Goats_Hogs

    Yep, most of us probably won't own a set of aluminum wheels that moisture induced oxidation will lead to rim leakage. :POKESS:  8|


    And for your amusement...

    Aircraft tires have some interesting traits/requirements.


    And for those who never gave much thought to inflating a tire...

    Slingshot Flyer! Well, of course it's red...

  • That video with them blowing up gives me a new respect for tires.....during inflation...pretty scary ...



    Also notice on the airplane wheels/tires....the grooves are just straight to remove water. Not fancy like on cars....makes me wonder if those curved grooves is just a sales gimmick....

  • That video with them blowing up gives me a new respect for tires.....during inflation...pretty scary ...



    Also notice on the airplane wheels/tires....the grooves are just straight to remove water. Not fancy like on cars....makes me wonder if those curved grooves is just a sales gimmick....

    airplane tires never have to corner at speed - totally different demands than on a car tire

    Cage Free - 2016 Pearl Red SL
    JRI GT coil overs, DDM short shifter
    Twist Dynamics Sway Bar & DDM mounts

    MeanSling Sport Top & OEM Dual Windshield + Misc Goodies

    Edited once, last by edwardaneal ().

  • That video with them blowing up gives me a new respect for tires.....during inflation...pretty scary ...



    Also notice on the airplane wheels/tires....the grooves are just straight to remove water. Not fancy like on cars....makes me wonder if those curved grooves is just a sales gimmick....

    Bigdog,,

    Keep a sharp overhead lookout for aircraft when on Tail of the Dragon.

    No charge for this info-a public service.