Serious Question RE: Adhesives

  • I know the usual super glue, gorilla glue, weatherstrip adhesive, JB weld etc, but what product have any of you used successful to repair a broken plastic / bakelite / pvc part? The piece I need is no longer produced and it's not worth having someone tool up to make me one. I would just like to be able to "glue the three pieces back together" successfully once without doing a trial and error. I even thought about trying that late night infomercial where they use a "pen size laser" to activate their solution, but as usual, most of those things are way over priced and under performing.


    Any thoughts?

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  • That's probably the route I'm going to try first. I'm just not a "buyer" of these glue 'em together and in 60 seconds you can glue your boat back together type of products. It doesn't have a LOT of stress to it, but I guess there's enough to have broken the original one into 3 pieces. Might have hit something without realizing it at the time.

    Thanks

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  • .


    Don't know what kind of part you are fixing but my go to is:



    Prefer it because you can form it and tool it to fill in missing pieces or finish it to make a repair invisible. Fixed many a bike part that is no longer in production with almost no failures of the repaired areas after years of stress. Proper prep is key.


    ........... nerd-squared

    :REDSS: The ghost of SLingshot past ......

  • I've used the JB Weld before with good results for metal products, but never any plastics. I have all the pieces in good size chunks and they fit together tightly. I don't need anything to fill the voids, which is why I was leaning away from this one or the other 2 part epoxy products. But they do work. I was kinda hoping that someone bought and had good results with any of the thin items like super glue or Monkey glue items. Heck if this gets too be too tough to glue back together, I might just try tracing it on a piece of aluminum and cutting one out of that for myself. Thanks for the input OM. I'll let you know what I end up doing this week (if I finish my taxes first)

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  • A lot depends on the type of plastic. If you search on welding plastic on some 3D printing sites you will find out some info on it. Some 3D print projects are larger then can be printed on a 3D printer so the they are printer in parts and welded together. it is much like welding metal but the plastic filament is spun in a Dremel Tool and becomes the welding rod. When used like a welding rod friction melts it and the adjoining pieces and they become one piece. I have a print file to build a electric guitar body so expect it is petty strong. You have to know what plastic you are dealing with.

    If the music is to loud you are to old.

  • Not trying to sound like an @$$, but all I know about the material is that is black and looks like plastic. I'm sure it was water-jetted from a sheet of something, but there's no way for me to tell what it was (unless there's an easy way to determine what it actually is)

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  • I have used this stuff to fix a LOT of things. In the first pic there’s actually 2 packets, part A & B. When mixed, it’s a milky white but dries clear. There’s different colors for different materials. Have attached a color chart also. Looks like you need blue or orange for PVC.


    The military & NASA use this stuff.



    Slingshots: making children out of adults since 2014

    Edited once, last by Tripod ().

  • LOL. Somehow I just KNEW you would have experience using HARDMAN :):):) I'm sure if the government uses it, it has to work. Thanks. Now to find me some.

    It’s a little spendy but you get what you pay for. I always have to order it online. I usually get it on eBay or Amazon.

    Slingshots: making children out of adults since 2014

  • I know the usual super glue, gorilla glue, weatherstrip adhesive, JB weld etc, but what product have any of you used successful to repair a broken plastic / bakelite / pvc part? The piece I need is no longer produced and it's not worth having someone tool up to make me one. I would just like to be able to "glue the three pieces back together" successfully once without doing a trial and error. I even thought about trying that late night infomercial where they use a "pen size laser" to activate their solution, but as usual, most of those things are way over priced and under performing.


    Any thoughts?

    What about the model airplane glue we all used as kids? Can you still buy that anywhere?

    The world would be a different place if everyone listened to country music...

  • I know the usual super glue, gorilla glue, weatherstrip adhesive, JB weld etc, but what product have any of you used successful to repair a broken plastic / bakelite / pvc part? The piece I need is no longer produced and it's not worth having someone tool up to make me one. I would just like to be able to "glue the three pieces back together" successfully once without doing a trial and error. I even thought about trying that late night infomercial where they use a "pen size laser" to activate their solution, but as usual, most of those things are way over priced and under performing.


    Any thoughts?

    Liquid Steel I think it is. I use it for everything from patching eye glass frames to the black plastic over the left front tire on the Sling, it has not broke in at least a year. Also for repairing the threads in some stuff

  • I guess I should have done an online search to see what's out there. Here's one test comparison of a few products on different materials. Looks like overall the JB Weld is the best overall as well as being the cheapest price tested.


    Thanks for all the suggestions


    https://youtu.be/H4xX7VecgzA


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  • I'f used the aluminum weld to repair a broken transmission case many years ago. It held fine and there was a LOT of stress on that part. If I can't find any of Tripods Hardman stuff, I'll be using the JB Weld. I'll let you guys know.


    Thanks for all the input especially on a holiday

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  • Funny thing is the Hardman Yellow that I would need is only like $6.00. Almost as much as the shipping. Might be worth having one on hand. I'm sure this won't be the only thing that breaks over the rest of my life - unless that's coming up sooner than I'm hoping for.

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