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      funinthesun wrote:

      Thanks for the tip. I'm hoping to use the old fashioned ones since I've got a box of em just taking up space
      Off-topic story about old-fashioned light bulbs and the EU. After the EU outlawed conventional filament light bulbs, an enterprising German started importing them as "incandescent heaters" since they radiate most of the energy they consume as heat! :D
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      BKL wrote:

      funinthesun wrote:

      Thanks for the tip. I'm hoping to use the old fashioned ones since I've got a box of em just taking up space
      Off-topic story about old-fashioned light bulbs and the EU. After the EU outlawed conventional filament light bulbs, an enterprising German started importing them as "incandescent heaters" since they radiate most of the energy they consume as heat! :D
      It was not me
      Do not resent growing old. Many are denied.... The Privilege :REDSS: :SUPERCHARGERSS: : :HEADERSS: : :COILOVERSS: Wycket hitch
      mytoy-toy.us
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      When I lived in Massachusetts, Virginia and even California (Monterey), we always had our incoming water shut-off valve inside the house. I took it for granted that that was the correct way for 2 reasons, freezing weather and security. Imagine my shock when we moved to the Houston, Texas area where we routinely have at least 1 period of below-freezing temps every year, sometimes, even 2 and realized our master shut-off valve was OUTSIDE the house exposed to the elements as well as exposed to any jerk who wanted to mess with us! We also have 3 external water faucets exposed to the weather and one of them also exposes the water line to top off the pool. The 2 external hose faucets I cover with an insulated bucket held to the wall with an elastic cord. For the master shut-off valve and the pool top-off line/valve, I cut a trash can in half, placed insulation inside the trash can walls and keep that over the two exposed valves with a metal worklight suspended off the pipe with a thermostatically-controlled 60-100W incandescent bulb to keep each valve warm. I've been planning to make a securely mounted wooden box to protect/secure each of those valves, as I only use the insulated cover during colder weather.
      Our irrigation valves are buried in the ground and we haven't had a problem, but my neighbor's above-ground irrigation valve recently froze and sprayed water all over. I pointed out my heated/insulated cover, but he still had it replaced with another above ground unit because he said the other had worked for years before it froze.
      At a minimum, I'd expect my main water shut-off valve to be inside my house or in a secure location just for security!
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      ericastar76 wrote:

      We’re totally going to be moving stuff (sadly)... this place is filling up way too TURBO SILVER fast (so you know there’s no way we’re getting ahead of it). We really need the framing and are expecting the Mark7 soon!
      That is why I was reminding you about the paint.
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      FunCycle wrote:

      ericastar76 wrote:

      We’re totally going to be moving stuff (sadly)... this place is filling up way too TURBO SILVER fast (so you know there’s no way we’re getting ahead of it). We really need the framing and are expecting the Mark7 soon!
      That is why I was reminding you about the paint.
      I’m mostly going to cover the walls with french cleats. Fortunately, most of the tools and such are on casters, so moving stuff around is a cinch.
      I'm the Official Comfort Control Specialist in Erica's Slingshot... :00009320:
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      sideslinger wrote:

      KayTwo wrote:

      Stacy, when you're done, I might need help putting some additional lights in the 3rd bay of the garage here.... LOL
      I think it’s time to put your big boy pants on and climb a ladder. :whistling:
      Oh, I have no problem with ladders. I just know fuck-all about residential electricity.
      :BLUESS:
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      KayTwo wrote:

      sideslinger wrote:

      KayTwo wrote:

      Stacy, when you're done, I might need help putting some additional lights in the 3rd bay of the garage here.... LOL
      I think it’s time to put your big boy pants on and climb a ladder. :whistling:
      Oh, I have no problem with ladders. I just know fuck-all about residential electricity.
      I understand. I did a lot of research on electrical, as I’m a complete novice. There are so many different codes to follow, based on what and where you are wiring. Safety is the biggest thing. I wired a few things in the past, so I’m comfortable tackling it, but it isn’t second nature to me yet. There is a pride in completing it yourself.
      I'm the Official Comfort Control Specialist in Erica's Slingshot... :00009320:
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      I know fuck-all about residential electricity yet I've re-wired numerous circuits, added numerous new circuits, installed a thousand new can lights, added under-cabinet lighting, wall heaters, ceiling fans, bathroom vent fans, etc. and I have not shocked myself more than 42 times (my count). You'll get used to it!

      Embrace the Charge!
      I may not be not the fastest, but that's OK because I'm not the best either...
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      I like that you ran your #12's in EMT and didn't run romex. A million years ago I was an industrial electrician and romex was not allowed. I always said if I ever wired my own house everything would be in a conduit. Makes it much easier if down the road you want to add a circuit or change things.I also like that you used metal boxes - I hate plastic boxes. I found it interesting back in the day plastic was not allowed in commercial because it could let off deadly gases in a fire - yet the same idiots that made the rules thought it was perfectly okay to let those same plastic boxes be installed in a persons home.
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      not to get technical but your outlets are upside down. for some reason - perhaps looks - most people think the ground goes on the bottom. The reality is that the ground is really supposed to go on the top - the reason for this is to keep anything like a wire or metal shavings from falling across the hot and neutral if the plug is out a bit. having the ground on top helps block things and makes it safer. normally even electricians dont worry much about this, but in a metal working shop I would.


      having said this even when I wan an electrician we installed them with the ground down because if we didnt the clients would complain - the only exception was a job we did building out a medical office - - in all my years since that time the only place I have seen them installed correctly was at the hospital and in a few shops

      The post was edited 1 time, last by edwardaneal ().

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      SlingLow wrote:

      and I have not shocked myself more than 42 times (my count). You'll get used to it!
      Aaaaaand there's the other big issue. I effin' hate getting shocked. I hate even thinking about it. Maybe because I grew up with the Navy electrical system on ENTERPRISE (did you know all shipboard electrical systems are ungrounded? Truth.), which was 450V, then moved to a newer carrier which was 4160V. I hate being zapped. I took a 220 hit across the finger of one hand friggin' around with my AC system air handler in on of my houses in VA Beach a number of years ago, after I had supposedly killed the circuit (didn't know about the control power coming in in a separate line to an internal fuse), and it pissed me off for weeks. Just hate it.

      In all seriousness though, Stacy, I love the idea of a couple LED fixtures. I may pick your brain for all the parts needed, and then maybe talk you into coming by to supervise....
      :BLUESS:
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      You are correct

      edwardaneal wrote:

      not to get technical but your outlets are upside down. for some reason - perhaps looks - most people think the ground goes on the bottom. The reality is that the ground is really supposed to go on the top - the reason for this is to protect if plug is out a bit and something falls across it wont land right across the hot and the neutral


      having said this even when I wan an electrician we installed them with the ground down because if we didnt the clients would complain - the only exception was a job we did building out a medical office - - in all my years since that time the only place I have seen them installed correctly was at the hospital.
      You are correct but they are also easier to come unplugged if the ground is up. I have been wiring since 1967 and we never installed with the ground up and never did change any. Also if the ground is up and it becomes partly unplugged the ground will be unplugged and whatever is plugged in will still be hot. (no ground connection)

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