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  • Now my wife can put up those French cleats/tool hangers she's promised to make me... all my stuff is either on the floor or plastic pallet racks!

    When are you going to paint
    some nice bright white on those walls would brighten up the place

    Unfortunately, it’s easy to let the garage get out of hand.


    I was going to suggest both the cleats and the white walls, dang it. Too late to the party, as usual. Don't forget the ceiling either. And, before you get too much more stuff crammed in there, you might want to consider an epoxy floor coating. Usually, I'm not one to toot my own horn (at least, not in public :whistling: ) but here's a few pics from my place. Sorry for the messiness; too many things "in progress" at once. As noted above, it's easy to let things get out of hand, especially for us ADD folks...




    Light colors on the walls, floor, and ceiling, make all the difference!




    Despite the mess, if needed, I could have both vehicles parked in the garage in less than 15 minutes. The top of the cluttered table, in front of the Harley (under the blue cover), folds down and the whole thing rolls up under the heavy bench along the back wall. (source: The Family Handyman magazine)



    The contractor table saw folds up and hangs on the wall (French cleats!) under the bandsaw and router table. The hanging rack (for the saw and my big x-cut sled) pivots the whole thing off the floor and against the wall, leaving the floor clear. (my own design)



    My crazy dust collector. Harbor Freight single stage collector pre-filtered via Thien cyclone that I built. (source: www.jpthien.com/cy.htm)



    Hanging cabinet keeps spare tables and chairs relatively dust free. Helmets... not so much. Also a great place to prominently display my slingshotinfo.com calendar! :thumbup:



    Maximize use of wall space by hanging crap from French cleats or hanging from other crap that is hanging from French cleats!



    All my sheet goods (long stuff standing upright since I have the clearance) on a rolling rack. Base is about 24x36 and fits neatly in this corner.



    Unless you need it always at the ready, mount table top stuff (grinder/buffer, router, bandsaw, vises, etc.) to a base that can be quickly clamped wherever and whenever you need it, then squirrel it away on a shelf when you don't.



    And don't let the ceiling go to waste, especially above the garage door.


    The roof carrier, the extension ladder, and the bundle of PVC pipe (7'x7'x7' knock-down paint booth) are each hoisted up on pulleys. The roof carrier (with trailer packed inside) weighs close to 150 lbs, so it's attached to a winch in the opposite corner. In case you were counting, yes, I have 5 ladders (4ft., 6ft. 8ft., 17ft. multi, & 28ft. ext. At 5' 6", I need then all. Hey! I'm not short, I'm fun-size!


    Anyway, just thought I'd share some tips to help you make the most of the space you have. And, if you don't mind some shameless self-promotion, my own site (Made4Madilyn) will be official as soon as I've linked it to my domain (made4madilyn.com).


    BTW, noticeably absent from my shop is computerization (no CNC or 3D printer...yet), so all my forms and jigs are made the old-fashioned way. It's good enough for now but I'm getting frustrated with the process. Until I have the time and money to tinker with that stuff, I might have to partner with someone that has the high tech tools to speed up the tooling and prototype process. So, if you happen to know anyone like that... :D


    You two are off to a great start (in fact, I'm a bit jealous) and I have no doubt you're going to wow us all with some really awesome stuff! :thumbsup:

  • @Gadgeteer has mo shi/stuff than I do, I do have a table saw that is moving to a new home. It takes up to much floor space for how often that I use it.

    Actually, I've got more shi/ stuff than I know what to do with and I'm struggling to find places to put it away, hence the messiness. I've still got stuff in a rental storage space that I need to bring in too. It's getting to a point that I'm starting to forget what I have and/or where it is. :S


    "Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so."
    ― Douglas Adams

  • Actually, I've got more shi/ stuff than I know what to do with and I'm struggling to find places to put it away, hence the messiness. I've still got stuff in a rental storage space that I need to bring in too. It's getting to a point that I'm starting to forget what I have and/or where it is. :S

    You know that I do understand but at 70 years old I can get rid of stuff because I will never use it. I have deleted stuff, this makes the third time in 15 years. Parts also 57 ford rear end a dodge straight axle with drum brakes, chev starters and a 29 ford wind shield frame (both pieces) that are still here

  • @Gadgeteer Wow! Great shop! You got a little bit of everything in there. More impressive is how you worked it all in there and can still walk around. I like the idea of storing extra lumber toward the ceiling. I do plan on making my dust collector 2 stage, I just need to settle on the location. So many great ideas! :thumbup:

    I'm old enough to know better, but young enough to do it anyway.

  • ^^^ Actually, it can be done pretty inexpensively & there’s a couple of ways to do it. Replace the entire fixture(s) with a LED one(s) or you buy LED tubes that fit into the existing flourescent fixtures) - you just remove/bypass the ballast. Lots of options on Amazon. My garage had a measly ONE 4’ flourescent fixture - I removed it & installed a 4’ LED fixture (6K daylight) & added a 2nd pull string-type LED fixture that just plugs into the outlet where your garage door opener plugs in. It’s literally a night & day difference!



    I didn't want to be the one to say this but I noticed you only have one ball hanging by a string - shouldn't you at least have one more ..... for the Slingshot

  • @Gadgeteer Wow! Great shop! You got a little bit of everything in there. More impressive is how you worked it all in there and can still walk around. I like the idea of storing extra lumber toward the ceiling. I do plan on making my dust collector 2 stage, I just need to settle on the location. So many great ideas! :thumbup:

    Thanks and glad you found it interesting! One other trick worth pointing out is the lighting under the garage door. That was one of my own ideas. Whenever the door is up it casts a big shadow, so I mounted 36" under-cabinet fixtures to the tracks to compensate. Works great and leaves the space between the wall, track, and ceiling free of additional obstructions. :thumbup:



    "Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so."
    ― Douglas Adams

  • I didn't want to be the one to say this but I noticed you only have one ball hanging by a string - shouldn't you at least have one more ..... for the Slingshot

    It's not the number of balls the man has which matters, it's what he does with them.


    "Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so."
    ― Douglas Adams

  • You two are off to a great start (in fact, I'm a bit jealous) and I have no doubt you're going to wow us all with some really awesome stuff! :thumbsup:

    And here I was ~> jealous of your workshop! :P


    *Heck, there’s a bunch of us in our forum family with KILLER workshops to be jealous of (one day... one day)!! :thumbup:

  • Hope y’all aren’t get tired of me posting progress pics... (I really don’t want to rush the workshop... I’m having a blast building it out and want to do it right)! :thumbsup:


    That out of the way, here’s a pic of the new air manifold and pressure regulator I assembled to handle the auto-tool changer (among other accessories). Works like a charm and no leaks... tested at 125 PSI.


    *don’t mind the temporary hose stops I rigged ~> it’s easier in the long run than using set-screws



  • Hmmm... I wonder what those temporary hose stops would feel like if they blew out at 125 psi? :/ Be careful.

    Thanks Hun ~> while I sealed the caps pretty well... normal operating pressure is only between 75-80 psi (all the hose lines should be installed before I shoot out my knees). X/